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International Writing Contest: Edward Tawe Short Fiction Prize for Charity

Writing Contest

Edward Tawe Short Fiction Prize for charity is an International Writing Contest organized to spur and discover talents in literature all over the world and at the same time support the education of the less privileged in rural Africa.

When to Enter the Edward Tawe Short Fiction Prize for Charity

The Edward Tawe Short Fiction Prize for Charity is launched four times a year and contesters are free to write on any subject and in any style they choose. There are no restrictions to age race and gender. Typically the contest is launched every January, April, July and October.

Entry Guidelines and Instructions (Please read carefully before entering)

Fiction Length: not more than 250 words

Font size: 12 double spaced

Font Type: Cambria (Headings)

Font Colour: Black

Document type: Microsoft Word .doc/.docx or PDF

Pages must be numbered.

Entrants are not allowed to write their names or identifications on any page in their story. Entries with identifications on stories will be cancelled.

Entrants to this International Writing Contest are free to go in with many entries as they want. Every entrant pays a non-refundable entry fee of $10 per entry.

Please address any worries to info@myafricaupdate.com

Edward Tawe Short Fiction Prizes

First Prize                  $100 plus free story publication on Africa Update Website

Second Prize             $60 Plus free story Publication on Africa Update Website

Third Prize                 $40 Plus free story Publication on Africa Update Website

ENTER THE EDWARD TAWE SHORT FICTION PRIZE FOR JULY 2017 HERE (link will be active from the 15th of July 2017).

2017 Edward Tawe Short Fiction Judge

Georgianna Mashego

University of Witwatersrand Johannesburg, South Africa.

About Edward Tawe

Edward Tawe Ndi short story prize, an International Writing Contest is organized in memory of Edward Tawe Ndi . He was born in 1944 in a small village in Cameroon called Taku.  He lived all his life in the rural North Western highlands of Cameroon and died trying to help many around him have a descent education which he himself did not have.  He was fun of reading stories of African origin and inspired many through it.

—–>>>    click here to submit your contest  <<<—–

 

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